The 7 references with contexts in paper V. Savitski G., A. Kemp, В. Савицкий Г., A. Кэмп (2015) “УПРОЩЁННЫЙ МЕТОД КАЛОРИМЕТРИЧЕСКОГО ИЗМЕРЕНИЯ ФОНОВЫХ ОПТИЧЕСКИХ ПОТЕРЬ В КРИСТАЛЛАХ // SIMPLIFIED METHOD OF CALORIMETRIC MEASUREMENTS OF BACKGROUND LOSS IN CRYSTALS” / spz:neicon:pimi:y:2012:i:2:p:76-78

1
Savitski, V.G. Characterization of Single-Crystal Synthetic Diamond for Multi-Watt ContinuousWave Raman Lasers / V.G. Savitski, I. Friel, J.E. Hastie [et al.] // IEEE Journal of Quantum Electronics. – 2012. – Vol. 48. – P. 328–337.
Total in-text references: 3
  1. In-text reference with the coordinate start=839
    Prefix
    (E-mail: vasili.savitski@strath.ac.uk) Key words: calorimetric method, optical absorption, synthetic diamond. Introduction An important consideration for laser intracavity use of single crystal (SC) chemical vapour deposition (CVD) grown diamond
    Exact
    [1, 2]
    Suffix
    is the insertion loss of a material. For diamond, this is typically dominated by absorption associated with nitrogen impurities – predominantly single substitutional nitrogen [3]. The absorption of early generations of SC CVD grown diamond was measured by Turri et al. using laser calorimetry [4].

  2. In-text reference with the coordinate start=2650
    Prefix
    This indicates the importance of understanding the absorption characteristics of diamond if the performance of intracavity Raman lasers is to be optimised. Experimental results The single-crystal CVD-grown diamond under investigation was supplied by Element Six Ltd. The same sample was used as in a previous study
    Exact
    [1]
    Suffix
    . It was cut for light propagation along a <110> axis and had a length of 6,5 mm. The crystal had a low birefringence of Δn ~1,3∙10-6 [1]. The sample had no anti-reflection coatings. The absorption coefficient of the sample was measured using an adapted form of laser calorimetry.

  3. In-text reference with the coordinate start=2784
    Prefix
    Experimental results The single-crystal CVD-grown diamond under investigation was supplied by Element Six Ltd. The same sample was used as in a previous study [1]. It was cut for light propagation along a <110> axis and had a length of 6,5 mm. The crystal had a low birefringence of Δn ~1,3∙10-6
    Exact
    [1]
    Suffix
    . The sample had no anti-reflection coatings. The absorption coefficient of the sample was measured using an adapted form of laser calorimetry. The voltage drop across a Peltier element due to the heat deposited by laser illumination was measured.

2
Lubeigt, W. Continuous-wave diamond Raman laser," W. Lubeigt, G.M. Bonner, J.E. Hastie [et al.] // Optics Letters. – 2010. – Vol. 35. – P. 2994– 2996.
Total in-text references: 2
  1. In-text reference with the coordinate start=839
    Prefix
    (E-mail: vasili.savitski@strath.ac.uk) Key words: calorimetric method, optical absorption, synthetic diamond. Introduction An important consideration for laser intracavity use of single crystal (SC) chemical vapour deposition (CVD) grown diamond
    Exact
    [1, 2]
    Suffix
    is the insertion loss of a material. For diamond, this is typically dominated by absorption associated with nitrogen impurities – predominantly single substitutional nitrogen [3]. The absorption of early generations of SC CVD grown diamond was measured by Turri et al. using laser calorimetry [4].

  2. In-text reference with the coordinate start=1676
    Prefix
    As van Loon et al. demonstrated [5], this birefringence made intracavity use of such materials problematic. In 2010, Lubeigt et al. reported on the use of low-birefringence material (Δn < 5∙10-7) to demonstrate the first continuouswave diamond Raman laser
    Exact
    [2]
    Suffix
    . However this material had an absorption coefficient of ~0,03cm-1 at 1064 nm (inferred from Caird analysis of the intracavity losses [6]). This elevated loss limited the performance of the Raman laser.

3
Friel, I. Development of high quality single crystal diamond for novel laser applications / I. Friel [et al.] // Optics and Photonics for Counterterrorism and Crime Fighting VI and Optical Materials in Defence Systems Technology VII, Toulouse, France, 2010.
Total in-text references: 3
  1. In-text reference with the coordinate start=1034
    Prefix
    Introduction An important consideration for laser intracavity use of single crystal (SC) chemical vapour deposition (CVD) grown diamond [1, 2] is the insertion loss of a material. For diamond, this is typically dominated by absorption associated with nitrogen impurities – predominantly single substitutional nitrogen
    Exact
    [3]
    Suffix
    . The absorption of early generations of SC CVD grown diamond was measured by Turri et al. using laser calorimetry [4]. The absorption coefficients at 1064 nm ranged from 0,003 to 0,07 cm-1. However, much of the materials investigated in this study – including the samples with the lowest absorption – had significant spatially varying birefringence.

  2. In-text reference with the coordinate start=2136
    Prefix
    Subsequently, Friel et al. reported on the growth of singlecrystal diamond that combined low birefringence (Δn < 10-6) with an absorption coefficient at 1064 nm measured to be ~0,001 cm-1 by ISO-standard laser calorimetry
    Exact
    [3]
    Suffix
    . Material of this grade was then used to demonstrate an eight fold improvement in the output power of continuous wave diamond Raman lasers [7]. This indicates the importance of understanding the absorption characteristics of diamond if the performance of intracavity Raman lasers is to be optimised.

  3. In-text reference with the coordinate start=6458
    Prefix
    The manufacturer’s specification for the absorption coefficient of the KGd(WO4)2 crystal (one of the widely used Raman crystal) is < 0,004cm-1. As the absorption measurements for the present diamond sample and for the samples in
    Exact
    [3, 7]
    Suffix
    show, the absorption loss of modern synthetic diamond can now be close to that of more conventional optical materials. Figure 2 – Losses in diamond sample as a function of pump photon energy

4
Turri, G. Optical absorption, depolarization, and scatter of epitaxial single-crystal chemical-vapordeposited diamond at 1.064 μm / G. Turri [et al.] // Optical Engineering. – 2007. – Vol. 46. – Р. 064002.
Total in-text references: 1
  1. In-text reference with the coordinate start=1152
    Prefix
    For diamond, this is typically dominated by absorption associated with nitrogen impurities – predominantly single substitutional nitrogen [3]. The absorption of early generations of SC CVD grown diamond was measured by Turri et al. using laser calorimetry
    Exact
    [4]
    Suffix
    . The absorption coefficients at 1064 nm ranged from 0,003 to 0,07 cm-1. However, much of the materials investigated in this study – including the samples with the lowest absorption – had significant spatially varying birefringence.

5
Loon, F. van Intracavity diamond heatspreaders in lasers: the effects of birefringence / F. van Loon, A.J. Kemp, A.J. Maclean [et al.] // Optics Express. – 2006. – Vol. 14. – P. 9250–9260.
Total in-text references: 1
  1. In-text reference with the coordinate start=1432
    Prefix
    However, much of the materials investigated in this study – including the samples with the lowest absorption – had significant spatially varying birefringence. As van Loon et al. demonstrated
    Exact
    [5]
    Suffix
    , this birefringence made intracavity use of such materials problematic. In 2010, Lubeigt et al. reported on the use of low-birefringence material (Δn < 5∙10-7) to demonstrate the first continuouswave diamond Raman laser [2].

6
Caird, J.A. Quantum Electronic-Properties of the Na3Ga2Li3F12:Cr3+ Laser / J.A. Caird, S.A. Payne, P.R. Staver [et al.] // IEEE Journal of Quantum Electronics. – 1988. – Vol. 24. – P. 1077–1099.
Total in-text references: 1
  1. In-text reference with the coordinate start=1820
    Prefix
    In 2010, Lubeigt et al. reported on the use of low-birefringence material (Δn < 5∙10-7) to demonstrate the first continuouswave diamond Raman laser [2]. However this material had an absorption coefficient of ~0,03cm-1 at 1064 nm (inferred from Caird analysis of the intracavity losses
    Exact
    [6]
    Suffix
    ). This elevated loss limited the performance of the Raman laser. Subsequently, Friel et al. reported on the growth of singlecrystal diamond that combined low birefringence (Δn < 10-6) with an absorption coefficient at 1064 nm measured to be ~0,001 cm-1 by ISO-standard laser calorimetry [3].

7
Lubeigt, W. 1.6W continuous-wave Raman laser using low-loss synthetic diamond / W. Lubeigt, V.G. Savitski, G.M. Bonner [et al.] // Optics Express. – 2011. – Vol. 19. – P. 6938–6944.
Total in-text references: 2
  1. In-text reference with the coordinate start=2301
    Prefix
    et al. reported on the growth of singlecrystal diamond that combined low birefringence (Δn < 10-6) with an absorption coefficient at 1064 nm measured to be ~0,001 cm-1 by ISO-standard laser calorimetry [3]. Material of this grade was then used to demonstrate an eight fold improvement in the output power of continuous wave diamond Raman lasers
    Exact
    [7]
    Suffix
    . This indicates the importance of understanding the absorption characteristics of diamond if the performance of intracavity Raman lasers is to be optimised. Experimental results The single-crystal CVD-grown diamond under investigation was supplied by Element Six Ltd.

  2. In-text reference with the coordinate start=6458
    Prefix
    The manufacturer’s specification for the absorption coefficient of the KGd(WO4)2 crystal (one of the widely used Raman crystal) is < 0,004cm-1. As the absorption measurements for the present diamond sample and for the samples in
    Exact
    [3, 7]
    Suffix
    show, the absorption loss of modern synthetic diamond can now be close to that of more conventional optical materials. Figure 2 – Losses in diamond sample as a function of pump photon energy