The 14 references with contexts in paper V. Savitski G., S. Calvez, M. Dawson D., В. Савицкий Г., С. Калвез , М. Доусон Д. (2015) “ПОЛУПРОВОДНИКОВЫЙ ДИСКОВЫЙ ЛАЗЕР С ПЕРЕСТРАИВАЕМОЙ ДЛИНОЙ ВОЛНЫ ИЗЛУЧЕНИЯ, ГЕНЕРИРУЮЩИЙ МЕТОДОМ РАЗГРУЗКИ РЕЗОНАТОРА ИМПУЛЬСЫ С ЭНЕРГИЕЙ НЕСКОЛЬКО МИКРОДЖОУЛЕ // MICRO-JOULE CAVITY-DUMPED WAVELENGTH-TUNABLE SEMICONDUCTOR DISK LASER” / spz:neicon:pimi:y:2010:i:1:p:45-50

1
Calvez, S. Semiconductor disk lasers for the generation of visible and ultraviolet radiation /S. Calvez, J.E. Hastie, M. Guina [and others] // Laser and Photonics Reviews. – 2009. –No 3. – P. 407–434.
Total in-text references: 5
  1. In-text reference with the coordinate start=867
    Prefix
    Introduction In the past decade, semiconductor disk lasers (SDLs), also known as vertical external-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VECSELs), have proven to be attractive sources for the generation of highbrightness laser radiation
    Exact
    [1–4]
    Suffix
    . The combination of a surface-emitting semiconductor gain element and a bulk external optical cavity has enabled SDLs to produce (multi)-Wattlevel single-transverse-mode operation with fundamental emission wavelength ranging from the red to 2.8μm [1–3, 5–6].

  2. In-text reference with the coordinate start=1137
    Prefix
    The combination of a surface-emitting semiconductor gain element and a bulk external optical cavity has enabled SDLs to produce (multi)-Wattlevel single-transverse-mode operation with fundamental emission wavelength ranging from the red to 2.8μm
    Exact
    [1–3, 5–6]
    Suffix
    . Furthermore, efficient intracavity nonlinear-frequency-conversion in these lasers has permitted output from the ultraviolet [1, 7–8] to the mid-infrared [9]. So far, these sources have primarily been operated in continuous-wave [1–3, 10] or quasi-continuous, highrepetition-rate mode-locked regimes [4], capitalizing on the nanosecond upper state lifetime characteristic of t

  3. In-text reference with the coordinate start=1277
    Prefix
    combination of a surface-emitting semiconductor gain element and a bulk external optical cavity has enabled SDLs to produce (multi)-Wattlevel single-transverse-mode operation with fundamental emission wavelength ranging from the red to 2.8μm [1–3, 5–6]. Furthermore, efficient intracavity nonlinear-frequency-conversion in these lasers has permitted output from the ultraviolet
    Exact
    [1, 7–8]
    Suffix
    to the mid-infrared [9]. So far, these sources have primarily been operated in continuous-wave [1–3, 10] or quasi-continuous, highrepetition-rate mode-locked regimes [4], capitalizing on the nanosecond upper state lifetime characteristic of the III–V semiconductor gain section.

  4. In-text reference with the coordinate start=1396
    Prefix
    Furthermore, efficient intracavity nonlinear-frequency-conversion in these lasers has permitted output from the ultraviolet [1, 7–8] to the mid-infrared [9]. So far, these sources have primarily been operated in continuous-wave
    Exact
    [1–3, 10]
    Suffix
    or quasi-continuous, highrepetition-rate mode-locked regimes [4], capitalizing on the nanosecond upper state lifetime characteristic of the III–V semiconductor gain section. However, recently, there has been increased interest in investigating their potential as sources of energetic nanosecond pulses.

  5. In-text reference with the coordinate start=1797
    Prefix
    However, recently, there has been increased interest in investigating their potential as sources of energetic nanosecond pulses. To-date, this regime of operation has been approached by gain-switching
    Exact
    [1, 11 – 14]
    Suffix
    with either pulsed semiconductor or solid-state laser pumps. Here, we introduce and demonstrate an alternative method, cavity-dumping, which exploits a CW-pumped gain section and an intracavity acousto-optic deflector to generate wavelength-tunable nanosecond pulses from an SDL.

2
Schulz, N. High-brightness long-wavelength semiconductor disk lasers / N. Schulz, J.-M. Hopkins, M. Rattunde [and others] // Laser and Photonics Reviews. – 2008. – No 2 (3). – Р. 160–181.
Total in-text references: 3
  1. In-text reference with the coordinate start=867
    Prefix
    Introduction In the past decade, semiconductor disk lasers (SDLs), also known as vertical external-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VECSELs), have proven to be attractive sources for the generation of highbrightness laser radiation
    Exact
    [1–4]
    Suffix
    . The combination of a surface-emitting semiconductor gain element and a bulk external optical cavity has enabled SDLs to produce (multi)-Wattlevel single-transverse-mode operation with fundamental emission wavelength ranging from the red to 2.8μm [1–3, 5–6].

  2. In-text reference with the coordinate start=1137
    Prefix
    The combination of a surface-emitting semiconductor gain element and a bulk external optical cavity has enabled SDLs to produce (multi)-Wattlevel single-transverse-mode operation with fundamental emission wavelength ranging from the red to 2.8μm
    Exact
    [1–3, 5–6]
    Suffix
    . Furthermore, efficient intracavity nonlinear-frequency-conversion in these lasers has permitted output from the ultraviolet [1, 7–8] to the mid-infrared [9]. So far, these sources have primarily been operated in continuous-wave [1–3, 10] or quasi-continuous, highrepetition-rate mode-locked regimes [4], capitalizing on the nanosecond upper state lifetime characteristic of t

  3. In-text reference with the coordinate start=1396
    Prefix
    Furthermore, efficient intracavity nonlinear-frequency-conversion in these lasers has permitted output from the ultraviolet [1, 7–8] to the mid-infrared [9]. So far, these sources have primarily been operated in continuous-wave
    Exact
    [1–3, 10]
    Suffix
    or quasi-continuous, highrepetition-rate mode-locked regimes [4], capitalizing on the nanosecond upper state lifetime characteristic of the III–V semiconductor gain section. However, recently, there has been increased interest in investigating their potential as sources of energetic nanosecond pulses.

3
Tropper, А. С. Extended cavity surface-emitting semiconductor lasers / А. С. Tropper, S. Hoogland // Progress in Quantum Electro nics. – 2006. – No 1. – P. 43.
Total in-text references: 3
  1. In-text reference with the coordinate start=867
    Prefix
    Introduction In the past decade, semiconductor disk lasers (SDLs), also known as vertical external-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VECSELs), have proven to be attractive sources for the generation of highbrightness laser radiation
    Exact
    [1–4]
    Suffix
    . The combination of a surface-emitting semiconductor gain element and a bulk external optical cavity has enabled SDLs to produce (multi)-Wattlevel single-transverse-mode operation with fundamental emission wavelength ranging from the red to 2.8μm [1–3, 5–6].

  2. In-text reference with the coordinate start=1137
    Prefix
    The combination of a surface-emitting semiconductor gain element and a bulk external optical cavity has enabled SDLs to produce (multi)-Wattlevel single-transverse-mode operation with fundamental emission wavelength ranging from the red to 2.8μm
    Exact
    [1–3, 5–6]
    Suffix
    . Furthermore, efficient intracavity nonlinear-frequency-conversion in these lasers has permitted output from the ultraviolet [1, 7–8] to the mid-infrared [9]. So far, these sources have primarily been operated in continuous-wave [1–3, 10] or quasi-continuous, highrepetition-rate mode-locked regimes [4], capitalizing on the nanosecond upper state lifetime characteristic of t

  3. In-text reference with the coordinate start=1396
    Prefix
    Furthermore, efficient intracavity nonlinear-frequency-conversion in these lasers has permitted output from the ultraviolet [1, 7–8] to the mid-infrared [9]. So far, these sources have primarily been operated in continuous-wave
    Exact
    [1–3, 10]
    Suffix
    or quasi-continuous, highrepetition-rate mode-locked regimes [4], capitalizing on the nanosecond upper state lifetime characteristic of the III–V semiconductor gain section. However, recently, there has been increased interest in investigating their potential as sources of energetic nanosecond pulses.

4
Keller, U. Passively modelocked surface-emitting semiconductor lasers / U. Keller, A. C. Tropper // Physics Reports. – 2006. – No 429. – С. 67 – 120.
Total in-text references: 2
  1. In-text reference with the coordinate start=867
    Prefix
    Introduction In the past decade, semiconductor disk lasers (SDLs), also known as vertical external-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VECSELs), have proven to be attractive sources for the generation of highbrightness laser radiation
    Exact
    [1–4]
    Suffix
    . The combination of a surface-emitting semiconductor gain element and a bulk external optical cavity has enabled SDLs to produce (multi)-Wattlevel single-transverse-mode operation with fundamental emission wavelength ranging from the red to 2.8μm [1–3, 5–6].

  2. In-text reference with the coordinate start=1471
    Prefix
    Furthermore, efficient intracavity nonlinear-frequency-conversion in these lasers has permitted output from the ultraviolet [1, 7–8] to the mid-infrared [9]. So far, these sources have primarily been operated in continuous-wave [1–3, 10] or quasi-continuous, highrepetition-rate mode-locked regimes
    Exact
    [4]
    Suffix
    , capitalizing on the nanosecond upper state lifetime characteristic of the III–V semiconductor gain section. However, recently, there has been increased interest in investigating their potential as sources of energetic nanosecond pulses.

5
Hastie, J. E. High power CW red VECSEL with linearly polarized TEM00 output beam / J. E. Hastie, S. Calvez, M. D. Dawson [and others] // Optics Express. – 2005. – P. 77 – l81.
Total in-text references: 1
  1. In-text reference with the coordinate start=1137
    Prefix
    The combination of a surface-emitting semiconductor gain element and a bulk external optical cavity has enabled SDLs to produce (multi)-Wattlevel single-transverse-mode operation with fundamental emission wavelength ranging from the red to 2.8μm
    Exact
    [1–3, 5–6]
    Suffix
    . Furthermore, efficient intracavity nonlinear-frequency-conversion in these lasers has permitted output from the ultraviolet [1, 7–8] to the mid-infrared [9]. So far, these sources have primarily been operated in continuous-wave [1–3, 10] or quasi-continuous, highrepetition-rate mode-locked regimes [4], capitalizing on the nanosecond upper state lifetime characteristic of t

6
Rösener, B. GaSb-based optically pumped semiconductor disk lasers emitting at a wavelength of 2.8 μm / B. Rösener, M. Rattunde, R. Moser [and others] – No 7578-32. // Photonics West – LASE 2010. – 2010.
Total in-text references: 1
  1. In-text reference with the coordinate start=1137
    Prefix
    The combination of a surface-emitting semiconductor gain element and a bulk external optical cavity has enabled SDLs to produce (multi)-Wattlevel single-transverse-mode operation with fundamental emission wavelength ranging from the red to 2.8μm
    Exact
    [1–3, 5–6]
    Suffix
    . Furthermore, efficient intracavity nonlinear-frequency-conversion in these lasers has permitted output from the ultraviolet [1, 7–8] to the mid-infrared [9]. So far, these sources have primarily been operated in continuous-wave [1–3, 10] or quasi-continuous, highrepetition-rate mode-locked regimes [4], capitalizing on the nanosecond upper state lifetime characteristic of t

7
Hastie, J. E. Tunable ultraviolet output from an intracavity frequency-doubled red verticalexternal-cavity surface-emitting laser. / J. E. Hastie, L. G. Morton, A. J. Kemp [and others]. – No 061114 // Applied Physics Let- ters. – 2006. – No 89.
Total in-text references: 1
  1. In-text reference with the coordinate start=1277
    Prefix
    combination of a surface-emitting semiconductor gain element and a bulk external optical cavity has enabled SDLs to produce (multi)-Wattlevel single-transverse-mode operation with fundamental emission wavelength ranging from the red to 2.8μm [1–3, 5–6]. Furthermore, efficient intracavity nonlinear-frequency-conversion in these lasers has permitted output from the ultraviolet
    Exact
    [1, 7–8]
    Suffix
    to the mid-infrared [9]. So far, these sources have primarily been operated in continuous-wave [1–3, 10] or quasi-continuous, highrepetition-rate mode-locked regimes [4], capitalizing on the nanosecond upper state lifetime characteristic of the III–V semiconductor gain section.

8
Chilla, J. Recent Advances in Optically Pumped Semiconductor Lasers / J. Chilla // Proc. of the Conference on Photonic Applications Systems Technologies. – 2008. – San Jose, Paper PTuD3.
Total in-text references: 1
  1. In-text reference with the coordinate start=1277
    Prefix
    combination of a surface-emitting semiconductor gain element and a bulk external optical cavity has enabled SDLs to produce (multi)-Wattlevel single-transverse-mode operation with fundamental emission wavelength ranging from the red to 2.8μm [1–3, 5–6]. Furthermore, efficient intracavity nonlinear-frequency-conversion in these lasers has permitted output from the ultraviolet
    Exact
    [1, 7–8]
    Suffix
    to the mid-infrared [9]. So far, these sources have primarily been operated in continuous-wave [1–3, 10] or quasi-continuous, highrepetition-rate mode-locked regimes [4], capitalizing on the nanosecond upper state lifetime characteristic of the III–V semiconductor gain section.

9
Stothard, D. J. M. Stable, continuous-wave, intracavity, optical paramateric oscillator pumped by a semiconductor disk laser (VECSEL) / D. J. M. Stothard, J.- M. Hopkins, D. Burns [and others] // Optics Express. – 2009. – No 17 (13).
Total in-text references: 1
  1. In-text reference with the coordinate start=1311
    Prefix
    semiconductor gain element and a bulk external optical cavity has enabled SDLs to produce (multi)-Wattlevel single-transverse-mode operation with fundamental emission wavelength ranging from the red to 2.8μm [1–3, 5–6]. Furthermore, efficient intracavity nonlinear-frequency-conversion in these lasers has permitted output from the ultraviolet [1, 7–8] to the mid-infrared
    Exact
    [9]
    Suffix
    . So far, these sources have primarily been operated in continuous-wave [1–3, 10] or quasi-continuous, highrepetition-rate mode-locked regimes [4], capitalizing on the nanosecond upper state lifetime characteristic of the III–V semiconductor gain section.

10
Baili, G. Experimental Investigation, Analytical Modeling of Excess Intensity Noise in Semiconductor Class-A Lasers / G. Baili,F. Bretena-ker, M. Alouini [and others] // Journal of Lightwave Technology. – 2008. – No 26 (8). – P. 952 – 961.
Total in-text references: 1
  1. In-text reference with the coordinate start=1396
    Prefix
    Furthermore, efficient intracavity nonlinear-frequency-conversion in these lasers has permitted output from the ultraviolet [1, 7–8] to the mid-infrared [9]. So far, these sources have primarily been operated in continuous-wave
    Exact
    [1–3, 10]
    Suffix
    or quasi-continuous, highrepetition-rate mode-locked regimes [4], capitalizing on the nanosecond upper state lifetime characteristic of the III–V semiconductor gain section. However, recently, there has been increased interest in investigating their potential as sources of energetic nanosecond pulses.

15
Maydan, D. Fast modulator for extraction of internal laser power / D. Maydan // J. Appl. Phys. – 1970. – No 41. – P. 1552 – 1559.
Total in-text references: 2
  1. In-text reference with the coordinate start=2843
    Prefix
    Finally, it readily offers the ability to generate electrical trigger signals for applications requiring electrical/optical synchronization. Laser description The SDL cavity arrangement used in this initial demonstration around 1060nm is similar to that proposed in early papers on cavity-dumped solidstate lasers
    Exact
    [15–17]
    Suffix
    . A four-mirror cavity was formed by an InGaAs/GaAs SDL gain/mirror structure [18] placed at the focus of a 150mm radius of curvature (ROC) mirror M1, and two curved mirrors with ROC of 205mm (Figure 1).

  2. In-text reference with the coordinate start=12556
    Prefix
    Wavelenght, nm Wavelenght, nm The oscillation frequency was measured to be ~420MHz which corresponds to twice the frequency of the acoustic wave generated in the AOM. This is consistent with the fact that a fraction of the reflected beam is fed back into the cavity and this fraction undergoes two frequency shifts when being reflected in and out of the cavity
    Exact
    [15]
    Suffix
    . Conclusions In conclusion, we report what we believe to be the first demonstration of a cavity-dumped SDL for the generation of wavelength-tunable, microJoule, nanosecond pulses. This form of operation takes full advantage of the high intracavity powers and broad wavelength tunability available in SDLs and the rapid and stable recovery of the intracavity field due to the sh

16
Maydan, D. Q-Switching and Cavity Dumping of Nd:YAlG Lasers / D. Maydan, R. B. Chesler // Appl. Phys. – 1971.– No 42. – Р. 1031–1034.
Total in-text references: 1
  1. In-text reference with the coordinate start=2843
    Prefix
    Finally, it readily offers the ability to generate electrical trigger signals for applications requiring electrical/optical synchronization. Laser description The SDL cavity arrangement used in this initial demonstration around 1060nm is similar to that proposed in early papers on cavity-dumped solidstate lasers
    Exact
    [15–17]
    Suffix
    . A four-mirror cavity was formed by an InGaAs/GaAs SDL gain/mirror structure [18] placed at the focus of a 150mm radius of curvature (ROC) mirror M1, and two curved mirrors with ROC of 205mm (Figure 1).

17
Kruegle, H. A. High peak power output, high PRF by cavity dumping a Nd:YA laser / H. A. Kruegle, L. G. Klein // Appl. Opt. – 1976. – No 15. – P. 466 – 471.
Total in-text references: 2
  1. In-text reference with the coordinate start=2843
    Prefix
    Finally, it readily offers the ability to generate electrical trigger signals for applications requiring electrical/optical synchronization. Laser description The SDL cavity arrangement used in this initial demonstration around 1060nm is similar to that proposed in early papers on cavity-dumped solidstate lasers
    Exact
    [15–17]
    Suffix
    . A four-mirror cavity was formed by an InGaAs/GaAs SDL gain/mirror structure [18] placed at the focus of a 150mm radius of curvature (ROC) mirror M1, and two curved mirrors with ROC of 205mm (Figure 1).

  2. In-text reference with the coordinate start=3471
    Prefix
    An acousto-optic modulator (AOM) was placed at the waist of the laser mode (mode radius 52m) between mirrors M2 and M3 (see Figure 1) with the output beam extraction being carried out as described in
    Exact
    [17]
    Suffix
    . The modulator had plane-plane parallel surfaces with anti-reflection (AR) coatings centered at 1060nm. A 2-mm-thick birefringent filter (BRF) was placed in a long cavity arm between mirrors M1 and M2, and provided laser wavelength tuning.

18
Maclean, A. J. Limits on efficiency and power scaling in semiconductor disk lasers with diamond heatspreaders / A. J. Maclean, R. B. Birch, P. W. Roth [and others] // Opt. Soc. Am. – 2009. – No B 26 – P. 2228 – 2236.
Total in-text references: 3
  1. In-text reference with the coordinate start=2937
    Prefix
    Laser description The SDL cavity arrangement used in this initial demonstration around 1060nm is similar to that proposed in early papers on cavity-dumped solidstate lasers [15–17]. A four-mirror cavity was formed by an InGaAs/GaAs SDL gain/mirror structure
    Exact
    [18]
    Suffix
    placed at the focus of a 150mm radius of curvature (ROC) mirror M1, and two curved mirrors with ROC of 205mm (Figure 1). The semiconductor structure includes 10 strain-compensated quantum wells (QWs), distributed over 10 anti-nodes of the optical field, and a 35.5-pair Al0.2Ga0.8As/AlAs distributed Bragg reflector.

  2. In-text reference with the coordinate start=5748
    Prefix
    Experimental results The dependence of the average output power of the diffracted beam on the incident pump power (on the diamond/semiconductor structure) is plotted in Figure 2 (a). The characteristic rollover in this power transfer curve is observed at ~20W of pump power. Such behavior is typical for SDLs
    Exact
    [18]
    Suffix
    and is attributed to induced thermal effects in the gain material at high pump powers. In the remainder of this work, the pump power was kept constant at 20W to ensure the highest output power from the laser.

  3. In-text reference with the coordinate start=11299
    Prefix
    This could be further improved by adjusting the cavity length in order to achieve a ratio between the intracavity mode and the pump spot at the semiconductor chip slightly larger than unity. This should not come at the expense of a significant energy penalty if the trend follows the behavior observed during continuous-wave operation
    Exact
    [18]
    Suffix
    . Figure 5 – Frequency response (a) (inset – output beam profile) and (b) pulse characteristics of the cavitydumped SDL with combined output (solid line) and single output (dashed line, for comparison) The performance of the laser when the two output beams (Outputs #1 and #2) are combined is shown in Figure 5.