The 11 reference contexts in paper V. Savitski G., A. Kemp, В. Савицкий Г., A. Кэмп (2015) “УПРОЩЁННЫЙ МЕТОД КАЛОРИМЕТРИЧЕСКОГО ИЗМЕРЕНИЯ ФОНОВЫХ ОПТИЧЕСКИХ ПОТЕРЬ В КРИСТАЛЛАХ // SIMPLIFIED METHOD OF CALORIMETRIC MEASUREMENTS OF BACKGROUND LOSS IN CRYSTALS” / spz:neicon:pimi:y:2012:i:2:p:76-78

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    (E-mail: vasili.savitski@strath.ac.uk) Key words: calorimetric method, optical absorption, synthetic diamond. Introduction An important consideration for laser intracavity use of single crystal (SC) chemical vapour deposition (CVD) grown diamond
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    is the insertion loss of a material. For diamond, this is typically dominated by absorption associated with nitrogen impurities – predominantly single substitutional nitrogen [3]. The absorption of early generations of SC CVD grown diamond was measured by Turri et al. using laser calorimetry [4].
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    Introduction An important consideration for laser intracavity use of single crystal (SC) chemical vapour deposition (CVD) grown diamond [1, 2] is the insertion loss of a material. For diamond, this is typically dominated by absorption associated with nitrogen impurities – predominantly single substitutional nitrogen
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    . The absorption of early generations of SC CVD grown diamond was measured by Turri et al. using laser calorimetry [4]. The absorption coefficients at 1064 nm ranged from 0,003 to 0,07 cm-1. However, much of the materials investigated in this study – including the samples with the lowest absorption – had significant spatially varying birefringence.
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    For diamond, this is typically dominated by absorption associated with nitrogen impurities – predominantly single substitutional nitrogen [3]. The absorption of early generations of SC CVD grown diamond was measured by Turri et al. using laser calorimetry
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    . The absorption coefficients at 1064 nm ranged from 0,003 to 0,07 cm-1. However, much of the materials investigated in this study – including the samples with the lowest absorption – had significant spatially varying birefringence.
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    However, much of the materials investigated in this study – including the samples with the lowest absorption – had significant spatially varying birefringence. As van Loon et al. demonstrated
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    , this birefringence made intracavity use of such materials problematic. In 2010, Lubeigt et al. reported on the use of low-birefringence material (Δn < 5∙10-7) to demonstrate the first continuouswave diamond Raman laser [2].
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    As van Loon et al. demonstrated [5], this birefringence made intracavity use of such materials problematic. In 2010, Lubeigt et al. reported on the use of low-birefringence material (Δn < 5∙10-7) to demonstrate the first continuouswave diamond Raman laser
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    . However this material had an absorption coefficient of ~0,03cm-1 at 1064 nm (inferred from Caird analysis of the intracavity losses [6]). This elevated loss limited the performance of the Raman laser.
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    In 2010, Lubeigt et al. reported on the use of low-birefringence material (Δn < 5∙10-7) to demonstrate the first continuouswave diamond Raman laser [2]. However this material had an absorption coefficient of ~0,03cm-1 at 1064 nm (inferred from Caird analysis of the intracavity losses
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    ). This elevated loss limited the performance of the Raman laser. Subsequently, Friel et al. reported on the growth of singlecrystal diamond that combined low birefringence (Δn < 10-6) with an absorption coefficient at 1064 nm measured to be ~0,001 cm-1 by ISO-standard laser calorimetry [3].
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    Subsequently, Friel et al. reported on the growth of singlecrystal diamond that combined low birefringence (Δn < 10-6) with an absorption coefficient at 1064 nm measured to be ~0,001 cm-1 by ISO-standard laser calorimetry
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    . Material of this grade was then used to demonstrate an eight fold improvement in the output power of continuous wave diamond Raman lasers [7]. This indicates the importance of understanding the absorption characteristics of diamond if the performance of intracavity Raman lasers is to be optimised.
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    et al. reported on the growth of singlecrystal diamond that combined low birefringence (Δn < 10-6) with an absorption coefficient at 1064 nm measured to be ~0,001 cm-1 by ISO-standard laser calorimetry [3]. Material of this grade was then used to demonstrate an eight fold improvement in the output power of continuous wave diamond Raman lasers
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    [7]
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    . This indicates the importance of understanding the absorption characteristics of diamond if the performance of intracavity Raman lasers is to be optimised. Experimental results The single-crystal CVD-grown diamond under investigation was supplied by Element Six Ltd.
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    This indicates the importance of understanding the absorption characteristics of diamond if the performance of intracavity Raman lasers is to be optimised. Experimental results The single-crystal CVD-grown diamond under investigation was supplied by Element Six Ltd. The same sample was used as in a previous study
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    . It was cut for light propagation along a <110> axis and had a length of 6,5 mm. The crystal had a low birefringence of Δn ~1,3∙10-6 [1]. The sample had no anti-reflection coatings. The absorption coefficient of the sample was measured using an adapted form of laser calorimetry.
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    Experimental results The single-crystal CVD-grown diamond under investigation was supplied by Element Six Ltd. The same sample was used as in a previous study [1]. It was cut for light propagation along a <110> axis and had a length of 6,5 mm. The crystal had a low birefringence of Δn ~1,3∙10-6
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    . The sample had no anti-reflection coatings. The absorption coefficient of the sample was measured using an adapted form of laser calorimetry. The voltage drop across a Peltier element due to the heat deposited by laser illumination was measured.
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    The manufacturer’s specification for the absorption coefficient of the KGd(WO4)2 crystal (one of the widely used Raman crystal) is < 0,004cm-1. As the absorption measurements for the present diamond sample and for the samples in
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    show, the absorption loss of modern synthetic diamond can now be close to that of more conventional optical materials. Figure 2 – Losses in diamond sample as a function of pump photon energy
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