The 139 references in paper Sandra Merscher , Alessia Fornoni , Сандра Мершер, Алессия Форнони (2016) “ПАТОЛОГИЯ ПОДОЦИТОВ И НЕФРОПАТИЯ - РОЛЬ СФИНГОЛИПИДОВ В ГЛОМЕРУЛЯРНЫХ БОЛЕЗНЯХ // PODOCYTE PATHOLOGY AND NEPHROPATHY - SPHINGOLIPIDS IN GLOMERULAR DISEASES” / spz:neicon:nefr:y:2016:i:1:p:10-23

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