The 7 references without contexts in paper William Poole () “Monetary aggregates targeting in a low-inflation economy” / RePEc:fip:fedbcp:y:1994:p:87-135:n:38

1
Rates in the 1970s." Journal of Monetary Economics, vol. 24 (September), pp. 331-51. Cook, Timothy and Steven Korn. 1991. "The Reaction of Interest Rates to the Employment Report: The Role of Policy Anticipations." Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond Economic Review, September/October, pp. 3-12. Duck, Nigel W. 1993. "Some International Evidence on the Quantity Theory of M
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2
Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, vol. 25 (February), pp. 1-12. Dueker, Michael J. 1993. "Indicators of Monetary Policy: The View from Implicit Feedback Rules." Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis Review, vol. 75 (September/October), pp. 23-39. Dwyer, Gerald P. and R.W. Hafer. 1989. "Interest Rates and Economic Announcements." Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis Econ
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3
Journal of Monetary Economics, vol. 1, pp. 443-73. Friedman, Benjamin M. and Kenneth N. Kuttner 1992. "Money, Income, Prices, and Interest Rates." The American Economic Review, vol. 82 (June), pp. 472-92. Friedman, Milton. 1959. A Program For Monetary Stability. New York: Fordham University Press. Friedman, Milt
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4
Elasticities of Money Demand in the United States." The Review of Economics and Statistics, vol. 73 (November), pp. 675-83. Poole, William. 1970a. "Optimal Choice of Monetary Policy Instruments in a Simple Stochastic Macro Model." Quarterly Journal of Economics, vol. 84 (May), pp. 197-216. --. 1970b. "Whither Mo
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6
Advance to Orthodoxy In the early years after the 1951 Treasury-Federal Reserve Accord first freed U.S. monetary policy from the wartime commitment to fix bond prices, monetary aggregates were far from the center of either mainstream macroeconomic thinking or Federal Reserve policymaking.
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7
Within an astonishingly short time, however, compared to the usual advance of intellectual ideas into the arena of practical affairs, not only academic economists but Federal Reserve officials as well came to place increasing weight on monetary quantities in their thinking. William Poole’s clas
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8
Reserve to far from transparent, therefore, that the familiar baseline model with fixed money growth has more empirical support than the models of Fuhrer and Taylor with fixed interest rates. But regardless of how that comparison turns out--and we should frankly acknowledge that in policy-oriented monetary economic
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