The 3 references with contexts in paper Michael Pesko, Christopher F Baum (2014) “The Self-Medication Hypothesis: Evidence from Terrorism and Cigarette Accessibility” / RePEc:boc:bocoec:865

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Baum, Christopher F., Mark E. Schaffer, and Steven Stillman, “Instrumental Variables and GMM: Estimation and Testing,”Stata Journal, 2003,3(1), 1–31. ,, and, “Enhanced Routines for Instrumental Variables / Generalized Method of Moments Estimation and Testing,”Stata Journal, 2007,7(4), 465–506.
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    We also perform an over-identification test using unweighted data.10We fail to reject the Amemiya–Lee–Newey over-identification test, which is equivalent to a Sargan test when the model is estimated with a two-step IV probit model
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    (Baum et al., 2003, 2007).
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    This suggests that the temporal distance measures are suitably exogenous to smoking. The coefficient of the association of stress on smoking is 0.509 when state unobservable characteristics are excluded.

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Schlenger, William E., Juesta M. Caddell, Lori Ebert, B. Kathleen Jordan, Kathryn M. Rourke, David Wilson, Lisa Thalji, J. Michael Dennis, John A. Fairbank, and Richard A. Kulka, “Psychological Reactions to Terrorist Attacks: Findings from the National Study of Americans’ Reactions to September 11,”JAMA : the Journal of the American Medical Association, August 2002,288(5), 581–8.
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    In equation (2),terrorismstis a unique set of variables for temporal distance from 9/11/2001, including posttand dayspost911t. The days after 9/11 variable allows the post-9/11 effect to respond linearly over time.6Previous research has suggested that increases in stress were strongly associated with 9/11,
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    (Schlenger et al., 2002; Schuster et al., 2001;
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    Pesko, 2014). In Figure 1, we show the mean levels of stress for the 23 states in which stress is collected in year 2002, which provides visual evidence of the pronounced increase in stress shortly after 9/11, and how quickly it returns to baseline.

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Schuster, Mark A., Bradley D. Stein, Lisa H. Jaycox, Rebecca L. Collins, Grant N. Marshall, Marc N. Elliott, Annie J. Zhou, David E. Kanouse, Janina L. Morrison, and Sandra H. Berry, “A National Survey of Stress Reactions after the September 11, 2001, Terrorist Attacks,”New England Journal of Medicine, 2001,345(20), 1507–1512.
Total in-text references: 1
  1. In-text reference with the coordinate start=18810
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    In equation (2),terrorismstis a unique set of variables for temporal distance from 9/11/2001, including posttand dayspost911t. The days after 9/11 variable allows the post-9/11 effect to respond linearly over time.6Previous research has suggested that increases in stress were strongly associated with 9/11,
    Exact
    (Schlenger et al., 2002; Schuster et al., 2001;
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    Pesko, 2014). In Figure 1, we show the mean levels of stress for the 23 states in which stress is collected in year 2002, which provides visual evidence of the pronounced increase in stress shortly after 9/11, and how quickly it returns to baseline.